plus sub section on Lucy Way Sistare Say, a.k.a. Lucy Say


Carol Sutton space1.gifWater Spirals & Aqua Nebula 3dbullit.gifby Walter Darby Bannard3dbullit.gif1983



DATE:November 19 to December 8,1983
Exhibition essay for show at Gallery One, Toronto
Paintings Series:Water Spirals & Aqua Nebula TM
by Walter Darby Bannand
canadaflag.gifPLACE:Toronto, Ontario, Canada


CASSIS LINNE © Carol Sutton,

measurements: 79.5 x 89 in.; 201.9 x 226.1 cm,description: Water Spiral Series. (Triangle Artist Workshop, July 1983), Golden acrylic on canvas, 1987sutton_cassis-tiny.jpg- Cassis Linne© by Carol Sutton
 

 
 
CAROL SUTTON'S NEW PAINTINGS -
Abstraction carries an uncomfortable authority these days, uncomfortable in the making, uncomfortable in the market, forced, Atlas-like, to carry the weight of the art of painting against the odds. Painting which operates only on its own terms doesn't give much of a handle to grab, doesn't let appreciation come in at different "levels", doesn't make it easy. The market has long recognized the pre-eminence of abstraction, implicit at least, but insists on vulgarizing if for the sake of sales. The "New Expressionism" like Pop Art before it, is watered-down, middle-brow abstraction with illustration hung on it. It should be called "de-abstraction". The straight realist painting today, as any sensitive observer knows, is far better than the pseudo-abstraction now so much in favour, and operates, from the inception, on a much higher plane of integrity.
 
 
Being an abstract painter is a courageous commitment, assuring exquisite frustration in the market. But it is easier for us than it was for Abstract Expressionists. The market sees us as hopelessly out of touch, beyond earshot, even, off the band-wagon. But at least they don't think we're loonies. Some of us even make a living form art. And there is an evolving environment of support and professional encouragement, if not sales, manifested, for example, by the Triangle Workshop in Pine Plains, NY, where I saw some of the paintings in this show.
 
 
If abstraction has a hard time in the market, it's hard in the making too. Realism serves up two made-to-order ingredients which do half the job for the artist: a "scene", which tells in detail what the painting will look like, or can look like, and deep space, a place to put the pieces where they can relate easily across and open interior. This doesn't make it easier for realist paint to be good, just easier to get started, and it clarifies what has to be done to work it through. The Abstract painter has to invent everything. I think that's why most of the best painters of the first generation of abstractionists matured so late, and why so few of them were consistently good. The first maps of any new territory are the roughest.
 
The first job of the abstract painter is to work out a scheme to make elements on a visually flat surface relate convincingly across the natural resistance of that surface: de Kooning expanded Cubism, Kline built black and white skeletons, Pollock wove airy nets, Rothko scrubbed on fuzzy, symmetric rectangles. Then come Frankenthaler's pastel stains, Louis's centrifugal stream, Noland's bright targets, Olitski's crammed edges. Each contrived a structure to replace that of depicted reality. Each left his invention in the inventory of form. There's a lot available to us now. That's one reason why there are so many artist of Carol Sutton's generation painting so well, so young without the painful blocks and disruptions that plagued the older painters.
 
 
Sutton's paintings of the last few years show us what a sharp, practical talent can do with what's come down to us. They give the impression of an untroubled inheritance, an art of enrichment rather than extremity, with a felicitous, unaffected directional structure, soft, pungent colour, surface open and breathing inside and around the edges, values often close but unforced, the stroke casual, unhurried , rippling carelessly like a banner in an easy wind. I know this doesn't give away what went into the pictures. All painters, certainly all young, serious painters, spend their days agonizing over their art. It is to Sutton's credit that the character of her painting belies the effort that went into them. There's a very fine long, horizontal asymmetric picture called Titan in the Edmonton Art Gallery
 
 

 

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which sums it up. Its easy going three-part composition is made up of one long diagonal jammed up with thick brushed acrylic greens, an opposing diagonal, very open, lightly swiped with orange and blue, and shots of yellow and lilac spray here and there, alongside and between the other colours. A sensual charge flows for the colour, intensified by the compression of the horizontal edges, which also precludes any left-over space around the attenuated diagonals.
 
 
Left-over space has been a problem for Sutton. The horizontal/diagonal pictures all have that nice colour-charge, sensual sweep and sparkling value change. But while a squarish painting filled top-to-bottom with horizontal layers well overload and short out the expressive effects, a squarish painting with a few layers asks that the remaining space be brought in the picture. There is nothing wrong with this situation. Olitski took it to an extreme in his great spray paintings of the 60's. Sutton handles this "extra" space skillfully but often as an afterthought, a necessity. And in art necessity can kill invention.
 
 
It may be fair to say that the two constituents of the superior artist are talent and seriousness - the ability to make good art plus the determination to make better art. And often it seems that the latter is 99% of it. Seriousness is what makes an artist fight herself and mess up a perfectly good style or method and go on to things unexpected, unfamiliar and usually unwelcome, losing customers and critical favour along the way. It's scary, and it is wasteful and destructive. But it's also the way art gets better. I'd guess that Sutton's new paintings will dismay many of her fans, because she has taken the familiar layered formation and rolled it up like a pile of rugs, a loose spiral which is ungainly, lacks clarity and certainly sits more awkwardly inside the painted rectangle than the familiar landscape form.
 
 
I think Sutton instinctively recognizes that her art, though carried by structure, get its life from variety of effect. The horizontal format tempted her to decorate, to lay on some handsome, arbitrary stroke or puff of spray, to get that space filled up with nice colour. By folding the layered horizontals over on themselves the painting was de-attenuated, concentrated, stuffed. The rectangle had to go back toward the square, and the "left-over" areas, though still a problem, diminish, hide in corners, and pick up various compositional duties and the structure, clustered rather than dispersed, offers a more fully rationalized environment for the playful bits of paint which enliven the picture.
 
 

 

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Sutton made this change late in 1982, painting a number of pictures which look like the earlier pictures rolled up. But something else began working its way into the paintings, something for which it now seems the new format was designed. For want of a better word, I'll call it "indelicacy". The colours got dark, puddled and smudged, the strokes coarsened, the intermediate passages clogged up. The paintings in the show, most of which were painted at Triangle workshop this summer, take it even further. Without knowing all of Sutton's work I'd bet they are the best paintings she's done.
 
 
They are not perfect. XENOPHORA EXUTUS, thought I saw it unstretched, seems too complex to be so symmetrical. Stretched up it might work - that marvelous breaking light might hold it. The rolled section of VENUS RANG divides off just a bit too much from the rest of the picture. WOBBLY KEYHOLE goes a little dark in the centre. There are arguable conclusions, based on slides and memory. And perfection is not the aim of good art. The paintings are first-rate, and new, and that's enough.
 
 
One of them CASSIS LINNE, gets out a little further than the rest, into another mode of picture-making, one that may be quite fruitful in the long run. The good thing about making changes is the oddities that come up. CASSIS LINNE is coloursitically duller than the other show paintings, less rich even that the grey and white IMPERIAL DELPHINULA and CHARONIA TRITIONIS, and it lacks the usual jivey surface embellishment. The spiraling darker areas turn ponderously until they hit the lighter centre, which seems to come from behind, to break through, like the moon through night clouds. This pushes the slow, smokey, smudged surround into the foreground, vitalizing it and vitalizing the picture, just as a stone hole shocks the glazed placidity of a window pane. It is a fine effect, and fine painting. The titles, incidentally , are seashells names, which are appropriate even if they encourage the mis-understanding of the "meaning" hounds, the people who still think the title comes before the painting and the critics who ran out of things to say before they learned to talk. Maybe you've got to hand these people something to deal with, because it looks to me as if these pictures are going to be tough to swallow. Well, the tougher the better. It only testifies to their quality and originality.
 
 

 

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DATE: 1983
Gallery One, Gallery Exhibition -Carol Sutton
canadaflag.gifPLACE:Toronto, Ontario, Canada


1983- " Water Spirals & Aqua Nebula",1984 - Rooster Conch,Rooster Conch, by Carol Sutton, date 1984, (Water Spirals and Aqua Nebula Series)33.5 x 51 in.; 85.1 x 129.5 cm-by Carol Sutton, artist ©
(Brochure text written by Darby Bannard, with Biographical Notes written by Carol Sutton), Gallery One, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, November 19 to December 8, 1983
 


 

Charonia Triton (Water Spiral Series) copyright 1983, by artist Carol Sutton,© 80 1/2space1.gifCHARONIA TRITON (WATER SPIRAL SERIES)

artist: Carol Sutton ©
series: water spiral
date: July 1983
materials: Golden Paint Acrylic on cotton canvas
measurements: 80 1/2 " x 91"
description: Water Spiral Series. SIGNED, TITLED AND DATED on VERSO --
notes: Triangle Artist Workshop, July 1983
 
 

 

BULLINA NOBILIS HABE (1) by artist Carol Sutton©-1984 space1.gifBULLINA NOBILIS HABE (1) © (WATER SPIRAL SERIES)

 
artist: Carol Sutton ©
series: water spiral
date: May 23, 1984
materials: Golden Paint Acrylic on cotton canvas
measurements: 80" x 93"
centimeters: 203.2 cm x 236.2 cm
description: Water Spiral Series. SIGNED, TITLED AND DATED on VERSO --
notes: BULLINA NOBILIS HABE (1) is the first of three similar works; the other two are: BULLINA NOBILIS HABE (2) 84/06/28A or June 28, 1984A, Size: 81.5" x 94.5", and BULLINA NOBILIS HABE (3), 84/06/28B or June 28, 1984B, Size: 80.5" x 94.5". both by Carol Sutton
Painting titled BULLINA NOBILIS HABE (1) online at this site.web.gif
Canadian Colour Field Painters: Pender Salon at Buschlen Mowatt Galleries; From Feb 7, 2011 - Feb 24, 2011; "This exhibition will feature Canadian artists critiqued by Greenberg working from the 1980s-1990s inspired by the tradition that built New York as an international epicentre for centemporary art and will include works by Harold Feist, Geoff Rees, Carol Sutton and Doug Haynes, and Helen Frankenthaller."
 
Canadian Colour Field Painters- Pender Salon - Image: Bullina Nobiles Habe : (by) Carol Sutton (at Buschlen Mowatt Galleries) - http://www.buschlenmowatt.com/exhibitions/canadian-colour-field-painters-pender-salon
 
 

 

Painting titled CASSIS LINNE online at CCCA site.web.gif

http://www.ccca.ca {Now must navigate to my name: click 'Artists', or 'Toronto' section under location.]

Cassis Linne, Water Spiral Series, Triangle Workshop 1983, Golden Acrylic on canvas, 79.5 x 89 inches, copyright ©, by artist Carol Suttonspace1.gifCASSIS LINNE (WATER SPIRAL SERIES)

artist: Carol Sutton ©
series: water spiral
date: May 23, 1984
materials: Golden Paint Acrylic on cotton canvas
measurements: 80" x 93"
centimeters: 79.5 x 89 in.; 201.9 x 226.1 cm
description: Water Spiral Series. (Triangle Artist Workshop, July 1983).


Rooster Conch © Carol Suttonspace1.gifRooster Conch, by Carol Sutton, date 1984, (Water Spirals and Aqua Nebula Series)33.5 x 51 in.; 85.1 x 129.5 cm

date: 1984

materials: Golden acrylic on canvas

measurements: 33.5 x 51 in.;

centimeters: 85.1 x 129.5 cm

description: Water Spiral Series.







Gem_Yellow.gifWALTER DARBY BANNARD: "from: Water Spirals & Aqua Nebula -The titles, incidentally, are seashell names, which are appropriate even if they encourage the misunderstanding of the "meaning Hounds, the people who still think the title comes before the painting and the critics who ran out of thing to say before they learned to talk. Maybe you've got to hand these people something to deal with, because it looks to me as if these pictures are going to be tough to swallow. Well, the tougher the better. It only testifies to their quality and originality."
 
(1983- brochure for 'The Water Spiral Series' shown at Gallery One, Toronto, Ontario, Canada - Walter Darby Bannard- Carol Sutton's New Paintings, exhibition catalogue essay, Gallery One, Toronto, Ontario, Canada,
November 1983)
 
Who is Walter Darby Bannard? - LINKS - Darby Bannard painting, title: June Park
Gem_Blue.gif#1. http://bannard.com
web.gif
flatbook.gif30 Books that contain Walter Bannard in Ask Art. Darby Bannard painting: title: cascades


LUCY WAY SISTARE Gem_Yellow.gifCONNECTION: TO SEASHELLS: acra zebra shell by Lucy Sistare Way

SEASHELL TITLES USED BY CAROL SUTTON, who is descendant of the SISTARE / SUSTARE FAMILY.

 
Gem_Yellow.gifLucy Way SISTARE Charles Wilson Peale oil portrait of Thomas Say in the uniform of the first Long Expedition, 1819; Collection of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia
Sex:  Female
Event(s):
Birth:  28 Nov 1800
New London Twp, New London, Connecticut
Death: 15 November 1886 , in Lexington, Massachusetts, of pneumonia.
Age eighty five, almost eighty six years old.
Burial: New York City
Parents:
Father:  Joseph SISTARE (1774-1829)
Mother:  Nancy Way (1775-1829)
Residence: several trips to New Harmony, IN, lived with her sister on Staten Island.
Married: 4 Jan 1827; secretly married by civil ceremony in the courthouse at Mt. Vernon, Indiana, attended only by Virginia Dupalais and Louisa Neef.
SPOUSE: Say, Thomas (27 Jan,1787- Oct 10, 1834, 7:00PM, evening) . Entomologist, conchologist. {see more below}
Relationship to Carol Lorraine Sutton is: 1C4R BlinkieFixed.gif{First Cousin Fourth Removed}
Occupation: Artist, illustrator of seashells and nature studies, wilderness explorer, executor of husband's Thomas SAY estate, posthumous publication of Say's work. Honor: the first woman elected to Academy of Natural Sciences membership , studied under Audubon and Lesueur in 1824 -SEE SISTARE INSTRUCTION -BELOW .
 
flatbook.gifThomas Say, American Conchology, or Descriptions of the Shells of North America Illustrated From Coloured Figures From Original Drawings Executed from Nature, Parts 1 - 6, New Harmony, 1830-1834; Part 7, Philadelphia, 1836. (Some of the illustrations in American Conchology were drawn by Mrs. Say.)
 
[Charles Wilson Peale, an oil portrait of Thomas Say in the uniform of the first Long Expedition, 1819; Collection of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia]

Lucy's SISTARE LINE: GENEALOGY DATA:
Gem_Yellow.gifLucy Way Sistare 1, sister to Sarah Lord Sistare, (born: 4 Nov 1816, New York City, New York, who married:18 Dec 1835, Reformed Protestant Dutch Church Of NY, by John Knox to Consul General of Nassau for United States of America William Augustus{Carl Wilhelm} KOBBE ; Noted Business Man Of New York City and the official Representative Of The Duchy Of Nassau, a Merchant.. Sarah Lord Sistare Kobbe died age 79 in 1896 in New York City. {Sarah had 10 siblings.}
________________________
Gem_Yellow.gifJoseph Sistare 2, {older brother to sibling: John Thomas Sistare, born in 1790, who was progenitor of the Kershaw, Lancaster District, South Carolina line of Sistare's and Sustare's.} and Gem_Blue.gifNancy Way (born: 6 Oct 1775, New London or New Haven, Connecticut, died: age 53, in the house of her father-in-law, John Way, on 21 Aug 1829) Daughter of John WAY (Born: 6 Oct 1740[2843] at: New London, New London, CT
Died: 11 Apr 1831[2844] at: New London, New London, CT) and Lucy LORD (24 Apr 1749 - 18 Aug 1789); also of New London , New London, CT. Joseph and Nancy had at least 11 children. {Joseph had 6 siblings.}
________________________
Gem_Yellow.gifCaptain Lazaro José Gabriel Sistéré/Sistare/Sistarre 3, [a.k.a. Don Gabriel Sistare y Mityavila] [born: 1 May 1725 in Barcelona, Spain- wave Spain flag tiny - 3dflagsdotcom_spnat2bs.gifdied: 25 February 1795 at the age of 69; in New London, Connecticut][GGGG Grandfather to Carol Sutton]
and Gem_Blue.gifElizabeth BEEBE, daughter of Nathaniel BEEBE Jr. (1710->1767) and Lydia Griffin (~1713->1767) {born: abt 1756, died, 11 September 1798, age 42, New London, Connecticut] Elizabeth was of English descent.
________________________
Gem_Yellow.gifDon Gabriel Sistare Sr. 5 , father of the Captain who came to America, Don Gabriel lived in Spain, Barcelona?wave Spain flag tiny - 3dflagsdotcom_spnat2bs.gif,
[TIME LINE: Before Reign Of Felipe V Was The First Spanish Bourbon King; 1700: With the death of Charles II, the dynasty of the Habsburg comes to an end and the War of the Spanish Succession breaks out, in which France, England and Austria are involved. ]
;born: about 1700, died: August 1734, in Barcelona, Spain or at Sea, [5G Grandfather of Carol Sutton, m. before 1724 to
Gem_Blue.gifMarie Mityavila, [5Great Grandmother of Carol Sutton] born: San Martin, Cassa De La Selva, Gerona, Spain?wave Spain flag tiny - 3dflagsdotcom_spnat2bs.gif, a cork producing place, about 1700, died : after 1726,
________________________
Gem_Yellow.gifDon Gabriel SISTARE/CISTERE 6, circa: born before 1680, Spainwave Spain flag tiny - 3dflagsdotcom_spnat2bs.gif
________________________
© by Carol Lorraine Sutton, daughter of Nancy Chester SUSTRE [ Nancy Chester Sustare is of the John Thomas Sistare line; i.e. Joseph Sistare 2, brother.], April 4, 2002.
TO VIEW CAROL's own SUSTARE or SUSTAR or SISTARE: ( Various spellings include-Sistaire, Sistera, Cistéré, Sistéré, Sistaré, Sistaire, Sustare, Sisstare, Sustar, Sistair, Sistar, Sistarelli)
 
web.gifGenealogy of Sustare -my Maternal side
  link updated 2013:
 
Southern branch of Sustare's from South and North Carolina & Virginia decendants of Captain Don Gabriel Sistare ( new full name -Lazaro José Gabriel Sistare II)
 
of Barcelona, Spain and then from New London, Connecticut, 1771, born 1725
 

WEBSITE: http://www.carolsutton.net/sustare/sustare-sistare_nc_va.html
 
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Lucy and Thomas are both listed in Latter Day Saints files
 

SISTARE , LUCY Way, INSTUCTION had been the finest at Marie Fretageot's boarding school
Gem_Yellow.gifCharles Alexander Lesueur (1 January 1778,Havre-de-Grace, France- 12 December 1846, Havre, France) and Gem_Blue.gifAudubon, John James ( birth date and place is disputed , New Orleans, 1780 or Aux Cayes, Haiti, 1785 -death date is undisputed at 1851)
link:http://www.inhs.uiuc.edu/~ksc/Malacologists/LesueurC.A.html
link:http://www.audubon.org/nas/jja.html
 
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Quote- P.T. Stroud, from pages 266 and 267; {also see 210: Lucy Say's study with Lesueur} : "Lucy could have been an artist of note had circumstances been more favorable to her talent's development, for her early instruction had been of the finest. At Marie Fretageot's boarding school at Twelfth and Walnut Streets in Philadelphia, both Lesueur {Charles Alexander} and Audubon had been her teaches. In describing to Benjamin Tappan her nine-week stay in Philadelphia during the summer of 1837, she mentioned that in addition to meeting Thomas Nuttall for the first time, "[I] saw also my old teacher in drawing Mr. Audubon who I had not seen since 1824 -- and then his great work had not yet been put into the Charles Alexander Lesueur-Frenchman, drawer of animals, Philadephia  Academy member. by Bodmer hands of the engraver." {footnote -28 - is: [Lucy Say to Benjamin Tappan, New York, 1 October 1837, Tappan Papers, Library of Congress.]}
[Painting to left: A detail of a painting by Karl Bodmer, 1833, Watercolor. Collection: Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska; title: 'Lesueur, the Naturalist, at New Harmony'.]
 
----When Audubon had come to Philadelphia in the spring of 1824 in his unsuccessful attempt to find a publisher for his bird paintings, he was as usual in need of money and had looked for work teaching drawing to young ladies k as he had done elsewhere in the past. Through his friendship with his fellow Frenchman Lesueur, whom he had met at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Audubon most likely secured a temporary position at Me. Fretageot's school, where Lesueur had been teaching for three years.
 
 
----Lucy had also seen part of the printed version of Audubon's Birds of America ( the publication was not concluded until 1838) at the Academy that summer; the members had subscribed for a complete copy of the elephant folios for five hundred dollars. She observed to Tappan: " Many and various opinions are expressed as to the merits of the work and the author - I am disappointed in the execution of the plates - considering the immense aid which he had at command and the price demanded for each volume." { footnote 29- } In mentioning the diversity of opinions expressed about Audubon and his work, Lucy alluded to the controversy over his scientific accuracy in depicting birds. One plate showed mockingbirds under attack by a rattlesnake, for example, and some Academy members refused to believe that such a confrontation was possible, In fact, later observers proved Audubon correct: it is now known that the canebrake rattler, common in the south , does indeed climb trees to dine on birds and their eggs. {footnote 30- [ Robert Elman, 'First in the Field: America's Pioneering Naturalists' (New York: Mason/Carter, 1977), 82.]. As to Lucy's remarks on the quality of the engraving, one can only surmise that her own attempts at the art had given he a thoroughly critical eye.
 
 
----Of Lucy's two teachers, one achieved a fame that would become monumental with the years, while the other would remain unknown to all but a few. " but what can be done in regard to Lesueur?" Harris [Thaddeus W. had written to her in 1835. " [He] seems forever lost to his friends and to the world, after a debut the most brilliant. Will he too pass away without leaving behind him any memorial so his eventful career, or any one to record this history of his life & labours? {footnote-31 [Harris to Lucy Say, pencil draft dated 1835, Harris Papers, Houghton Library, Harvard University.]}
----After Say's death and Lucy's departure, no one remained in New Harmony New Harmony, Indiana, circa 1830about whom Lesueur really cared, except his ward, Virginia Dupalais, [C.L.S. add in- Remember that Virginia Dupalais had been witness to Thomas Say and Lucy Way Sistare's wedding in 4 Jan 1827.] who had married and settled there. He had planned for years to return to France, so in 1837 he at last boarded the steamboat for New Orleans and sailed to LeHavre. For a while he lived in Paris near the Jardin de Plantes, earning a marginal living by teaching drawing, until in 1845 he was chosen to direct a new natural history museum in his native Le Havre. Lesueur moved there with his brother to a small house near the sea, to begin at last a career with both the prestige to which he had so long been entitled and the scope to use his prodigious talents. But he died suddenly of heart failure the following year, on 12 December 1846, a the age of sixty-eight."
{part of this last paragraph from page 168- STROUD} END Quote.
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MORE NOTES ON THOMAS SAY
 
Thomas SAY
Sex:  Male
Event(s):
Birth:  27 Jun 1787 ,Philadelphia, Phila., Pennsylvania
Death: Oct 10, 1834, 7:00 PM, evening, New Harmony, Indiana
THomas Say, black and whiteBurial: ?web.gif-[find a grave]- Behind a house on the corner of Main and Grainery, New Harmony, Posey County, Indiana  USA
(has a lovely light drenched photo of his grave showing metal plate sign and a biography by Leonard L. Brown.)Thomas Say grave, New Harmony, Posey County, Indiana, USA by Leonard L. Brown photo
LINK:http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GScid=640702&GRid=11835&
http://www.findagrave.com/index.html
 
Parents:
 
Father: Benjamin SAY (born:28 Aug 1755, in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pa. and died: 23 Apr 1813, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania County, PA; Burial Location Unknown., Honors: Congressman, U.S. Representative From Pennsylvania 1st District, 1808-09.;Soldier Served In The Continental Army During The Revolutionary War; Quaker/(Doctor Of Physic) (In Trust) For The Religious Society Of Friends, Known By Name Free Quakers.
 
 
Mother: Ann BONSALL ( born: ? , died: 1793)
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****
"Thomas Say accompanied William Maclure and other scientists and educators from Philadelphia on the famous "Boatload of Knowledge." The party arrived in New Harmony, Indiana, in January, 1826. One of the passengers was the artist Lucy Way Sistare, whom Say married secretly, near New Harmony, on January 4, 1827.
"In New Harmony, Say continued his descriptions of insects and mollusks, culminating in two classics (See books just below): "
 
 
 
 
 

Gem_Blue.gifSay - main site on EVANSVILLE EDU.
web.gif tiny updated.gifUPDATE URL: http://faculty.evansville.edu/ck6/bstud/say.html

THOMAS SAY- (1787-1834)- father of American entomology

... New Harmony, Indiana, in January, 1826. One of the passengers was the artist Lucy Way Sistare, whom Say married secretly, near New Harmony, on January 4, 1827.

... with hyper links
"In 1818 Say accompanied Maclure and others members of the Academy on an expedition to the off-shore islands of Georgia and Florida. In 1819-20, Major Stephen H. Long led an exploration to the Rocky Mountains with Thomas Say as zoologist, and in 1823, Say served as zoologist in Long's expedition to the headwaters of the Mississippi River.
During the 1819-20 expedition, Say first described the coyote, swift fox, western kingbird, band-tailed pigeon, Say's phoebe, rock wren, lesser goldfinch, lark sparrow, lazuli bunting, and orange-crowned warbler.
"Say was a taxonomist, as were most of the early entomologists, and he described considerably more than 1,000 new species of beetles and over 400 insects of other orders, thief_ant_Thomas_Say.jpg; Theif ant, entomologist Thomas Say including species in every important insect order. A hasty check of his writings shows 404 new species definitely listed from Indiana, including eight orders, as follows:
 
205 Hymenoptera [e.g., bees, wasps, ants] [See thief ant to the left]
111 Diptera [e.g., flies, mosquitos]
17 Coleoptera [beetles]
38 Hemiptera [e.g., squash bug, stink bug]
11 Homoptera [e.g., cicadas]
1 Neuroptera [e.g., lacewings]
5 Ephemerida [e.g., mayflies]
16 Odonata [e.g., dragonfiles, damselflies]"
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"In New Harmony, Say continued his descriptions of insects and mollusks, culminating in two classics: " -

TWO BOOKS BY THOMAS SAY:

flatbook.gifThomas Say, American Entomology, or Descriptions of the Insects of North America, 3 volumes, Philadelphia, 1824-1828.

flatbook.gifThomas Say, American Conchology, or Descriptions of the Shells of North America Illustrated From Coloured Figures From Original Drawings Executed from Nature, Parts 1 - 6, New Harmony, 1830-1834; Part 7, Philadelphia, 1836. illustrations in American Conchology were drawn by Mrs. Say(Some of the illustrations in American Conchology were drawn by Mrs. Say.)

 

[Illustration, from page 211, in the Patricia Shroud book, titled: Thomas Say : New World Naturalist; quote: "Fig. 40. Arca zebra, "inhabits the coastof the peninsula of Florida," by Lucy Say, plate 66 of American Conchology. Watercolor. Courtesy of the American Philosophical Society." end quote. ]

 

acra zebra shell illustration by Lucy Sistare Wayacra zebra shell illustration by Lucy Way Sistare (Say)

 

Links honoring Thomas Say
Canis latrans Say, [coyote]
Vulpes velox Say, [swift fox] Say velpes velox swift fox from evansvill.edu website[see 'Say vulpes velox swift fox' to right]
Indiana State Insect (Proposed): Pyractomena angulata (Say), [Say's firefly]
Leptinotarsa decimlineata (Say), [Colorado potato beetle]
Solenopsis molesta (Say), [thief ant]
Birds named by or in honor of Say (Photos by Peter LaTourrette)
Audubon drawings of birds first described by Thomas Say
Birds named by Say (Photos by Harold Holt)
Insects named by Say (3 photos)
American Entomology, Thomas Say's book, the first of its kind
Fishes Named in Honor of Thomas Say (drawing by Lesueur)
[Above portion fromweb.gif Say on EVANSVILLE EDU. URL: http://faculty.evansville.edu/ck6/bstud/say.htmlfossil-Chesapecten Jeffersonus (Say), named by Thomas Say
+
web.gifThomas Say-(June 27, 1787 ­ October 10, 1843) was an American naturalist, entomologist, malacologist and crustaceologist.-
(Thomas Say Conchology listings - http://www.inhs.uiuc.edu/~ksc/Malacologists/SayT.html )
right Thomas Say (June 27, 1787 ­ October 10, 1843) was an American naturalist, entomologist, malacologist and crustaceologist. He was a taxonomist and is often considered to be the founder of descriptive entomology in the United States. Thomas Say was born in Philadelphia into a prominent Quaker family.
web - http://www.termpapertopic.org/th/thomas-say.html - not working site. 
&
SAY names Chesapecten Jeffersonus (Say) A 4 million year old fossil (extinct scallop that lived in the early pliocene epoch between four and five million years ago on Virginia's coastal plain.)- In 1824, geologist John Finch gathered a large collection of mollusk fossils, includingweb.gif Chesapecten Jeffersonius (http://www.fossilshack.com/shells.html - 2013 update)  from the vicinity of Yorktown, Virginia, and gave them to scientists at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (ANSP). Chesapecten Jeffersonius (Outside) Scientist Thomas Say, at ANSP, described the species and named it Pecten jeffersonius to honor Thomas Jefferson. 

 
Thanks go to Dr. Gary E. Lohman of Great Mills, Maryland for alerting me to these ancient fossil shells and others named by Thomas Say, of the Upper Miocene Epoch and the Pliocene Epoch. Such as:
Family Naticidae ( commonly called Moon Shell), of the St. Mary's Formation:
Polinices duplicatus (Say) and Lunatia heros (Say), both are fauna of the Maryland Upper Miocene era.
also the:
Turritella plebia (Say), also in the St. Marys County, Maryland, USA site of Miocene formations. "It is a relatively small form with more or less convex whorls that are marked with fine uniform, or uniformly alternating, spiral ribs."
 
Phylum ...............Class...............Genus.............Species
Mollusca............Gastropoda.........Turritella..........plebia


TWO BOOKS ABOUT THOMAS SAY:

TO BUY BOOKflatbook.gif at web.gifAMAZON : Thomas Say : Early American Naturalist

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0405107374/qid=1017944411/sr=1-5/ref=sr_1_5/002-2333128-5555228

flatbook.giftitle: Thomas Say: Early American Naturalist
author: Harry B. Weiss, Grace M. Ziegler
Hardcover (June 1978)
Ayer Co Pub; ISBN: 0405107374Charles Wilson Peale oil portrait of Thomas Say in the uniform of the first Long Expedition, 1819; Collection of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia
 
First published in 1931
List Price: $26.95/Our Price: $26.95 at Amazon
 
 
 
AND:

flatbook.giftitle: Thomas Say : New World Naturalist
author: Patricia Tyson Stroud [herself a member of the SAY family]
ISBN: 0-8122-3103-1
Publisher: University of Pennsylvanis Press
(First full biography of Thomas Say in sixty years)
© 1992-Thr Barra Foundation, Inc.
Cover illustration: Portrait of Thomas Say by Charles Wilson Peale. oil painting,
Courtesy of The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia.
 
CAN OFTEN BE PURCHASED ON MY FAVORITEflatbook.gif MULTI - USED BOOK SEARCH ENGINE: TRUSSEL:BOOKS AND BOOK COLLECTIONG : http://www.trussel.com/f_books.htm
[which is where I ordered my own copy. C.L.S.]

 
Included in book Thomas Say : New World Naturalist, from page 270, quote: "Fig. 45. Lucy Say in old age, ca. 1880. Photograph. Courtesy of The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia."
by author: Patricia Tyson Stroud
Oval photographic portrait of Lucy Sistare Say, was done late in her life about 1880:Lucy Sistare Say portrait, 1800


ADDITIONAL WEB SITES ARE:

OWEN MSS.web.gifhttp://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/lilly/mss/html/owen.html - 2k -

... Dale Owen, Richard Owen, Robert Owen, Robert Dale Owen, 1801-1877, Robert Dale Owen, 1879-1917, William H. Owen, WA Page and Mrs. Lucy Way (Sistare) Say. ...

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Owen mss., 1821-1911, are, in the main, letters and papers of Richard Owen, 1810-1890, son of Robert Owen, professor at Indiana University, and first president of Purdue University, and his descendants. Included are also some letters of other members of the Owen family and prominent New Harmony, Indiana, citizens.

Among the correspondents are John William Boehne, Jeremiah Tilford Boyle, James LeRoy Davenport, Mrs. Jane Dale (Owen) Fauntleroy, Emery A. Foster, J. B. Hunter, Mrs. Anna Eliza (Neef) Owen, David Dale Owen, Eugene Fellenberg Owen, Horace Pestalozzi Owen, Mrs. Katharine (Fitton) Owen, Katharine Dale Owen, Malcolm Dale Owen, Richard Owen, Robert Owen, Robert Dale Owen, 1801-1877, Robert Dale Owen, 1879-1917, William H. Owen, W. A. Page and Mrs. Lucy Way (Sistare) Say. The first folder in the collection contains biographical information on Robert Dale Owen, David Dale Owen and William Owen, sons of Robert Owen. See also Arthur H. Estabrook, "The Family History of Robert Owen," Indiana Magazine of History, XIX, 63-101, March 1923. Collection size: 163 items For more information about this collection and any related materials contact the Manuscripts Department, Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 -- Telephone: (812) 855-2452.


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